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Special Fairy Tale issue of TEXT, an open-access online journal

Congratulations to editors Rebecca-Anne Do Rozario, Nike Sulway and Belinda Calderone. I appreciate their editorial expertise.
Into the Bush: Australasian Fairy Tales is an intriguing and enchanting read for those researchers and lovers of fairy tales.
Introduction: The state of play in Australian fairy tale: Where to now? Daniel Baker:
Facets of Eleanor Sherryl Clark:
The handkerchief of tears Michelle De Stefani:
Taming the Hobyahs: Adapting and re-visioning a British Tale in Australian literature and film Rebecca-Anne Do Rozario and Lorena Carrington:
Crafting Baba Yaga from the Australian landscape: An interview with Lorena Carrington Robyn Floyd:
Fairies in the bush: The emergence of a national identity in Australian fairy tales Kate Forsyth:
Retelling Rapunzel Louisa John-Krol:
Envoys to the empress Louisa John-Krol:
Fated intervention: Gracing, musing and the wishing well Sophie Masson:
A feather of Fenist the Falcon Kirstyn McDermott:
There is always a next witch: Creative intuition and collaborati…

Early Australian fairy tales digitized in TROVE

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Interpretation of text by the illustrator: contradictory positioning

Illustrations of Ernst’s assertive female characters by Dorothy Ashley do not offer the same perspective. Fang (1996) suggested that “whether intended or not, illustrations sometimes tell a slightly different or even contradictory story than the text” (p. 134). Many of the illustrations in Fairy tales from the land of the wattle by Ashley exemplify female figures in maternal, spiritual, or nurturing roles.Suggesting that illustrations are also cultural symbols that transmit meaning as effectively as written symbols, Meganck (2010) researched the portrayal of female images in children’s literature between 2000 and 2010 and applied the categories devised by Goffman (1978) in his analysis of non-verbal images of women in advertising to her study of picture book illustrations. These categories included relative size (in relation to the male), the feminine touch (caressing, nurturing), ranking and subordination.  This suggests that the illustration may communicate more about the artist and …

Reprinting early Australian fairy tales.

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Should we reprint them? Or does their appeal remain fixed in the era they were written? Hart (1950) made the point that, ‘books flourish when they answer a need and die when they do not’ (285) and it is worth considering for example the fairytales of Tarella Quin whose fairy tale books were reprinted numerous times. Quin (aka Quin Daskein), published her first fairy tale, Gum Tree Brownie in 1907[1] with enlargements and variations appearing with regularity in 1918, 1925, 1934 and 1983. Her publisher was still publishing one hundred years after her first book which allowed the opportunity for re-publishing it.  It was believed that public taste indicated this book could become popular again.


However, when Gum Tree Brownie was republished as The Other Side of Nowhere: Fairy Stories of the Never Never (1983) two stories that did not suit the current socio-cultural environment were omitted. Cruelty and death are not seen as suitable topics for children’s books today - or at least not in t…

Here's an Aussie fairy king with a slouch hat and a stock whip wand.

Some children assert that there are no fairies in Australia. Wait until you read this story, and then you shall judge for yourself.  It was summer; there had been no rain for many months; hardly a blade of grass was to be seen; the little left was of the colour of stubble. The once full-flowing creek was a chain of water-holes, very muddy, and harrowed with hoof-prints. The cattle and horses made tracks through the puddles night and morning. These thirsty half-starved animals came long, weary marches over the plains to drink, plodding through the water to the other bank in their weary search for grass or anything to feed upon. The only water for miles around was the turbid and scanty supply in the creek-already fast drying up. Settlers brought their tanks on drays, sometimes a distance of ten or twelve miles, taking a whole day to travel thither and back. By day the sun was blazing, and sank to rest in the evening a fiery-red veiled in a smoky shroud. Even the moon when it shone at ni…